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Cell Biology Teaching Resources

Still Images

Presentations

Cell Biology and Biotechnology in Space
Description: Cell biology in space is a relatively young discipline that must meet many unique challenges not faced in standard ground laboratory work. This presentation provides an introduction that identifies those challenges, profiles ways to model microgravity without going into space, discusses the value of the research, and explores what we do and do not know about the effects of space on cells. Slides and lecture notes are downloaded separately. (Posted on 10/04)

Cells & Spaceflight Hardware
Description: This unit from a short course on basic biology for engineers overviews the unique requirements cell research places on space flight hardware. The supplement features current approaches to cell biology hardware with images and brief descriptions of various hardware items. (Posted on 10/04)

Effects of Microgravity and Space Flight on Macrophages Description: This presentation covers the effects of microgravity and space flight on macrophages. Notes for the slides are included in the downloadable PowerPoint presentation. Choose "Notes Page" from the "View" pull-down menu in PowerPoint. (Posted on 10/00)

Effects of Space Flight on T-Cells Description: This presentation details an immunology experiment performed on T-cells in space. Notes for the slides are included in the downloadable PowerPoint presentation. Choose "Notes Page" from the "View" pull-down menu in PowerPoint. (Posted on 10/04)

Microgravity: A Novel Environment for Cells
Description: Life on Earth evolved in a constant gravitational environment. The microgravity of space is another matter entirely. How does microgravity change the environment for cells and how do cells respond? This presentation identifies the physical forces acting on cells, shows that life can thrive in various extremes, and addresses the impacts of microgravity. Slides and lecture notes are downloaded separately. (Posted on 10/04)

Still Images

Bioreactor
Bioreactor Source: NASA
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Description: The NASA bioreactor provides a model for simulating microgravity cell cultures on the ground. The rotating vessel maintains cells in a state of continual freefall allowing for the growth of three dimensional cultures. (Posted on 10/04)

Cell Apoptosis
Source: NASA
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Description: Cell dying through apoptosis, or cell suicide, undergoes distinctive changes. First it shrinks and pulls away from its neighbors (top right). Then blebs (pink spheres) appear on the surface (making the cell appear to boil), and the chromatin (black portion of larger inner cell), which is the nuclear DNA complexed with proteins) condenses at the edges of the nucleus. Soon the nucleus, and then the cell itself, breaks up, and the cell fragments are quickly ingested by other cells in the vicinity. (Posted on 10/04)

Cell Division: Metaphase
Cell Division: Metaphase Source: NASA
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Description: This image depicts a cell in mid-prometaphase. In this cell the spindle is forming between the well-separated centrosomes. Some of the chromosomes have established connections to both poles and are aligned at the spindle equator, while others are still connected only to one pole. (Posted on 10/04)

Cell Membrane Transfer
Cell Membrane Transfer Source: NASA
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Description: This line drawing depicts the components of a cell membrane. (Posted on 10/04)

Electron Micrograph of E. coli
Electron Micrograph of E. coli Source: NASA
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Description: This electron micrograph depicts a group of E. coli bacteria. (Posted on 10/04)

Renal Cell
Renal Cell Source: NASA
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Description: Research has found that genetic expression of human renal cells can be manipulated in microgravity to produce hormones that are valuable in the treatment of disease. (Posted on 10/04)